Kalogridis International’s portfolio also includes a Cessna Citation Columbus business jet
A Gulfstream G550 is fitted with Kalogridis’ carpet, and deconels for its window panels
The deconels can be embellished with crystal beads and LED lighting
Personalised artwork can be imprinted on the carpet and deconels
The hand-crafted carpets are dyed in-house
The Dancing Ivy deconel design features a signature embossed and recessed leaf pattern
Jetgala Wings
by Charmaine Tai
A NEW APPROACH TO AIRCRAFT ACOUSTICS

AN AIRCRAFT’S AESTHETICS AND PERFORMANCE DEPEND ON MANY THINGS — and using the right interior material is one. A familiar name in the aircraft industry, Dallas-based Kalogridis International, founded by George Kalogridis in 1976, designs and produces bespoke wool and silk carpets, as well as internal wall coverings and bulkhead tapestries for private and commercial jets. While these were popular, it became evident that an improved material was needed.

 

Bulkhead coverings were limited to hard, solid surfaces without acoustic abilities. Together with research and development designer LiChing Liu, the team developed improved surfaces known as deconels — patented 3D decorative panels that are softer, non-metallic, heat- and flame-resistant, lightweight and cost-effective. They are resistant to pressure marks and reduce noise levels by as much as 3.5 decibels. First introduced in 2003, they are applied to aircraft’s bulkheads, headliners, window panels and dado panels. They are also designed to suit multi-dimensional surfaces of any space, including yachts, offices, private residences and even private casino rooms. More than 300 designs are available, ranging from aerial views of the desert to split bamboo.

 

MORE THAN 300 DESIGNS ARE AVAILABLE, RANGING FROM AERIAL VIEWS OF THE DESERT TO SPLIT BAMBOO

Each deconel is bespoke. George Kalogridis and his team of in-house designers work closely with clients, and consult architects and top interior designers. Inspired by everyday experiences, Kalogridis once designed circles that mimicked the texture of grated wasabi. Natural and synthetic fabrics, as well as wood veneer, are often incorporated. The deconels can be embellished with metal inlays, crystals and LED lighting, as well as painted with original artwork on request. To add definition, several effects, including embossing, pleating, carving, shading, gold- and silver-leafing, can be done. Clients can choose from a variety of materials, such as ultraleather and ultrasuede, for sound-proofing. Smaller aircraft take 10 to 12 weeks to complete while large commercial aircraft require at least four months.

 

One can find the deconels in a Bombardier Challenger, Falcon 2000EX and Gulfstream G650, among other private jets. Aircraft interior design companies Gore Design and Greenpoint Technologies, as well as heads of state, are also regular clients. Others include Singapore Airlines which requested deconels for its aircraft. An American airline saved significant operational costs, as the deconels helped to reduce aircraft weight and fuel consumption.

 

SEVERAL EFFECTS, INCLUDING EMBOSSING, PLEATING, CARVING, SHADING, GOLD AND SILVER-LEAFING, ADD DEFINITION

The company also works with designers from Asia. Liu, who is Taiwanese and trained in pottery, drums up oriental designs with traditional flare. While most clients lean towards minimalist and contemporary designs, the company notices that its growing Asian clientele prefers culture-specific design elements, such as cherry blossoms and bamboo motif. Kalogridis recalls a Japanese client who specifically wanted gold leaves imprinted on the deconel.

 

Kalogridis plans to expand the company’s portfolio by combining its carpet and deconel designs — packaged as an overall concept for its clients. The carpets are hand-crafted using 100 per cent New Zealand virgin wool and silk, and are dyed in-house. Bespoke designs feature a range of textures and colours that complement the deconels, highlighted by metallic threads. Kalogridis says: “Deconels are a relatively new aircraft concept that not many people know about. Our mission in the next few years is to educate the market, to let them know what it can be used for.”

 

LIGHT CRAFT
Kalogridis International has recently developed a new technique for weaving fluorescent yarn into carpet. A range of patterns and graphics, such as company logos, can be incorporated. The company’s group of designers is currently working on a wave pattern, using piles of thick yarn. It is said that the soft carpet’s fluorescent effect resembles the glow of sea anemones.